Semester Overview

Semester I

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The fundamental principles of histology, the microscopic study of body tissues and organ systems in domestic animals, are presented in lecture and laboratory formats. Complementary understanding of developmental anatomy of the animal body is approached through the study of chick and pig embryos with reference to developmental anomalies.

Credit 4

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This course will introduce the students to basic anatomical concepts including anatomic terminologies and directional terms. The course focuses on comparative gross anatomy of the canine, equine and to a lesser extent bovine, feline and porcine. In the laboratory, embalmed canine cadavers will be fully dissected and compared with sections of the other species. Lecture/ tutorials will reinforce observations in the laboratory and will high-light structures of clinical importance to the practice of veterinary medicine as well as, to research and other areas of veterinary interest. The course will be integrated with radiographic anatomy and live animal palpations of the canine and equine .

Credit 4

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The course includes the cellular basis of animal physiology, basic neurophysiology and neural control of body systems, the organs, hormones and functions of the mammalian endocrine system, endocrine control of reproductive cycles and development and certain important diseases relating to the physiology of the mammalian and endocrine systems.

Credit 4

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The course covers basic and pathogenic bacteriology and mycology. The objective of the course is to give veterinary students a thorough introduction to the theoretical and practical basis for the study of bacterial and fungal pathogens of animals. Lectures cover description of the organisms themselves as well as virulence, pathogenesis, diagnosis and control of animal pathogens. Zoonotic potential of some of the microbes and food safety issues are also discussed. To relate concepts of lectures to practical, laboratory exercises are carried out using microbiological techniques for isolation and identification of disease causing bacteria.

Credit 4

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Provides entry-level DVM students with a strong grounding in professional skills. Students will be supported in developing core competencies, which contribute to success as a member of the veterinary profession. Topics include communication skills, ethical decision-making, professionalism, financial planning, information seeking diversity, and multicultural awareness and goal setting.

Credit 2

END TERM I

Semester II

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The course will give a review of the innate and acquired immunity and their components, including both the humoral and cellular arms of the immune response. The course is designed to help you in understanding the animal body defense mechanisms at cellular and molecular levels. The role of host defense mechanisms and the development of acquired immunity after infection will be discussed. The use of the different immunological tests in diagnosing animal diseases, malfunctions of the immune response and the role of vaccines in disease prevention will be covered.

Credit 4

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This course is a continuation of Anatomy 1. The tutorials, laboratories, radiographic anatomy and live animal palpation will follow a similar format and approach as in Anatomy I. The topics include the comparative gross anatomy of the pelvic viscera (urogenital organs), pelvic limb, perineum and head and neck. Neuro-anatomy and avian anatomy are integrated into this section.

Credit 4

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This course will focus on the control, physiological mechanisms and pathophysiology of the cardiovascular, respiratory, renal and non-ruminant and ruminant digestive systems. The basic physiology of birds, reptiles and fish and how specific aspects of physiology differ between these taxa and mammals will also be presented.

Credit 4

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This course investigates the basic properties and clinical aspects of important domestic and foreign animal viruses. Topics discussed include the nature, taxonomy, replication and pathogenesis of important virus families, as well as clinical and pathological characteristics, methods of diagnosis, epidemiology, and methods of treating, preventing and controlling the spread of specific viral diseases of veterinary significance. This course examines helminthic, protozoan, and arthropod parasites which affect domestic animals, including animal parasites transmissible to humans. Life cycles, identification, transmission, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of parasites are stressed in lecture. The laboratories focus on identification of parasites, and the clinical signs and lesions they produce.

Credit 4

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This course promotes the approach of evidence-based practice in veterinary medicine and the production of scientifically sound evidence to support clinical activities. Basic skills to utilize the scientific method in practice are taught including: Biostatistics, searching, sourcing, assessing, and applying clinical literature. The assessment and application of the evidence will be enhanced by an enhanced comprehension of building clinical evidence (i.e. clinical research skills). Designed to help students learn about fundamentals of research, including experimental planning and design, research bias, alternatives to animal use and animal welfare, the One Health concept, granting agencies, the components of grant writing and review process, types of research, IACUC, IRB, post-award considerations, how to conduct a research project, analysis of data and interpretation of experimental results, types of data presentations, manuscript preparation, critical evaluation of the scientific literature and on-line resources, and how this knowledge is used in the practice of evidence-based medicine. Students are exposed to active SNU research faculty and student research associates throughout the course.

Credit 2

END TERM II

Semester III

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The course focuses on the global principles of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and drugs affecting the autonomic nervous system. Additionally, categorical classes of anesthetics, analgesics, anti-inflammatory drugs will be presented. Upon completing this course, students will have obtained the pharmacologic knowledge base that can positively impact therapeutic choices that influence treatment, cure, prevention and mitigation of disease states and conditions in animals. Legal and regulatory issues that affect the practice of veterinary pharmacy will be emphasized. Additionally, current topics in veterinary medicine and veternary pharmacy will be discussed.

Credit 4

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This course examines the diseases and their processes in tissues and organs of the domestic animals. The general disease processes of cells and tissues—degeneration, necrosis, inflammation, growth abnormalities, and neoplasia—are studied, as well as the healing process. The theory part of the course includes pathology of important diseases of body systems: digestive, urinary, respiratory, circulatory, lymphatic, reproductive, nervous, musculo-skeletal, skin & appendages and sense organs. Pathology of metabolic diseases and nutritional deficiencies. The practical section of the course involves postmortem examination of small and large animals. Demonstration of histopathological slides of various systems. Visits to abattoirs and examination of different pathological conditions.

Credit 4

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This subject, putting a special emphasis on Mendelian, immuno-, clinical (hereditary diseases), population and molecular genetics, furthermore biotechnology and preservation of genetic resources. The methods of breeding value evaluation, selection, breeding improvement, and breeding systems are also synthesized, using the classical and up to date scientific knowledge of Mendelian, population and molecular genetics.

Credit 4

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This course is the first in a series of clinical skills courses and is intended to introduce students to the clinical aspects of veterinary medicine, with a primary focus on dogs, cats, and horses. Additionally, an emphasis is placed on performing a complete medical history and developing physical exam skills. Other topics covered include: breed identification, husbandry and preventive medicine practices, restraint and handling techniques, and SOAP writing skills. Field trips and practical labs are an important component of this course.

Credit 4

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This course reviews the basic feed constituents, energy, protein, fiber, minerals and vitamins; concepts in feed labeling; the characteristics of feeds used in animal feeding; animal management; and feeding guidelines for cats, dogs, cattle, small ruminants, horses and swine. The course incorporates real-life case examples and a few out-of-class assignments to reinforce important concepts.

Credit 2

END TERM III

Semester IV

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While etiology and pathogenesis are reviewed, emphasis will be given on clinical signs, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, treatment, control and prevention. Students will learn to characterize the etiology, epidemiology, and clinical manifestations of infectious diseases of ruminants and equines, describe the main transmission routes for infectious diseases, including animal-human, human-animal, vector-borne, water-borne, and air-borne cycles, explain mechanism of development/pathogenesis of diseases caused by different infectious agents in ruminants and equines. The course also will focus on the etiology, epidemiology, and clinical manifestations of metabolic disorders, deficiency diseases, plant/chemical toxicities and animal poisons in livestock and pets.

Credit 4

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Students learn the principles of hematology, cytology and clinical chemistry. They are taught to interpret clinical data derived from blood, serum, urine and aspirates from solid tissues and fluids. Clinical cases are presented to the students and they are required to apply their knowledge to interpret the cases and make appropriate differential diagnoses.

Credit 4

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Provides students with the fundamentals of epidemiologic theory as a means of understanding how epidemiology can be used in veterinary medicine. Introduces the concepts of emerging infectious diseases, bioterrorism and disaster medicine, as well as the epidemiology of various zoonotic diseases. Important aspects of public health such as milk hygiene, humane slaughter, meat inspection and food-borne diseases are also discussed.

Credit 4

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This course provides a general introduction to veterinary medicine, with emphasis on veterinary issues such as ethics, animal breeds, animal welfare, behavior, animal restraint and alternative medicine. Students will continue to develop their skills in history taking, physical exams and communication skills. Additional species, including food animals such as goats, pigs and cattle are presented for students to acquire appropriate animal handling skills.

Credit 4

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This course examines the husbandry of food animals, companion animals, and laboratory species as well as normal and abnormal behavior of these animals. Welfare assessment of animals and welfare issues related to the practice of veterinary medicine will be discussed.

Credit 2

END TERM IV

Semester V

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Students investigate concepts concerning the diagnosis, treatment, and management of infectious and non-infectious diseases affecting small companion animals, including dermatology, ophthalmology, urology, endocrinology, and more.

Credit 4

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Integrated lectures and laboratories are designed to introduce students to the principles of general and local anesthesia of small and large animals, and also recognition, treatment, and prevention of anesthetic emergencies. Laboratory instruction provides students with experience in small animal anesthesia, in addition to demonstrations of monitoring equipment, mechanical ventilation, and large animal general anesthesia.

Credit 4

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Anatomy and physiology of male and female reproductive system, Embryogenesis of male and female reproductive systems, Neural and neuroendocrine reflexes, Mechanisms of action of protein and steroid hormones, Classification of reproductive hormones, Roles of reproductive hormones, Factors affecting the onset of puberty, Factors influencing reproductive cyclicity, Folliculogenesis and oogenesis, Oocyte maturation and ovulation, Physiology of estrous cycle: Follicular Phase, Physiology of estrous cycle: Luteal Phase, Luteinisation and luteolysis, Reproductive behaviour, Sequence of spermatogenesis, Factors influencing sperm production, Physiology of copulation and ejaculation, Sperm transport in the female reproductive tract, Capacitation and fertilization, Early embryogenesis, Maternal recognition of pregnancy, Implantation and placentation, Sex differentiation, Endocrinology of gestation, Endocrinology of parturition, Physiology of puerperium, Physiology of equine reproduction, Physiology of caprine reproduction, Physiology of ovine reproduction, Physiology of canine reproduction, Physiology of feline reproduction

Credit 4

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Basic and clinical aspects of the more common poisonings that affect domestic animals/birds and wildlife will be considered. Emphasis will be given to intoxication resulting from drug interactions, pesticides (rodenticides, insecticides, herbicides), heavy metals (arsenic, copper, lead, iron, zinc etc.), poisonous plants, mycotoxins, gases, feed additives, poisonous and venomous animal toxins, household toxins, prescriptions/recreational/over the counter medications, selected industrial pollutants and forensic considerations.

Credit 4

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Introduction to fish, fisheries and aquaculture; fish diversity, source and consumers preference; fish identification, morphometric and meristic counts, dissection, anatomy and dressing percentage; construction and components of fish ponds; determination of water quality parameters (physical, chemical and biological-phytoplankton and zooplankton sampling and identification); diagnosis and control of infectious and metabolic fish diseases; formulation and preparation of aqua feed; types of fish hatchery and management; induced fish breeding techniques; ornamental fishes and aquarium making; fishing gears and netting.

Credit 2

END TERM V

Semester VI

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Students investigate concepts concerning the diagnosis, treatment, and management of infectious and non-infectious diseases affecting small companion animals, including cardiology, neurology, oncology, and other diseases.

Credit 4

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Introduction to Veterinary Anaesthesia, including Pre-anaesthetics and Anaesthetic agents and their uses; Pre-anaesthetic considerations; Types of anaesthesia (local, regional and general), and their clinical applications; Epidural and Paravertebral anaesthesia and their practical demonstration; Local nerve blocks (for dental, eye and horn surgeries and their practical demonstration); Local nerve blocks in limbs for lameness diagnosis and their practical demonstration. Stages of General Anaesthesia and patient monitoring during and after anaesthesia; Anaesthesia under field conditions; Practical demonstration of anaesthetic regimens for small and large animals (including dogs, cats, small ruminants, horses, donkeys, large ruminants and camels); Anaesthetic regimens for birds, exotics, and laboratory animals; Anaesthetic emergencies (cardiac arrest, respiratory failure, shock, acid base imbalance) and their management

Credit 4

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Medical conditions of horses are described and discussed with respect to etiopathogenesis, treatment, prevention and control, using a systems based, problem oriented approach. Principles of equine clinical pathology, therapeutics and critical care are addressed. Basic common surgical approaches for treatment of clinical problems will be discussed.

Credit 4

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Basic and clinical aspects of the more common poisonings that affect domestic animals/birds and wildlife will be considered. Emphasis will be given to intoxication resulting from drug interactions, pesticides (rodenticides, insecticides, herbicides), heavy metals (arsenic, copper, lead, iron, zinc etc.), poisonous plants, mycotoxins, gases, feed additives, poisonous and venomous animal toxins, household toxins, prescriptions/recreational/over the counter medications, selected industrial pollutants and forensic considerations.

Credit 4

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Introduction to fish, fisheries and aquaculture; fish diversity, source and consumers preference; fish identification, morphometric and meristic counts, dissection, anatomy and dressing percentage; construction and components of fish ponds; determination of water quality parameters (physical, chemical and biological-phytoplankton and zooplankton sampling and identification); diagnosis and control of infectious and metabolic fish diseases; formulation and preparation of aqua feed; types of fish hatchery and management; induced fish breeding techniques; ornamental fishes and aquarium making; fishing gears and netting.

Credit 2

END TERM VI

Semester VII

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This course covers anatomy, physiology, husbandry, and medicine of commonly kept exotic companion animals, including birds, small mammals, and reptiles. Discussion topics include clinical diagnostic techniques (including animal handling and restraint, physical examination, clinical sampling, imaging, necropsy), infectious and non-infectious diseases and medical and surgical approaches to treating these diseases. Important topics related specifically to the exotics animal practice and careers are also discussed.

Credit 4

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The course studies a selected list of common medical and surgical diseases of food producing animals. For each disease, the etiology, epidemiology, clinical signs, common differential diagnoses are presented, and ancillary methods for diagnosis are listed. Medical and supportive treatment options and surgical intervention are discussed for each condition. A preventive approach and public health significance for each disease condition is also presented. Ample case studies and clinical examples are presented in a lecture format. Swine, sheep, goats, camelids and cattle (beef and dairy) are discussed.

Credit 4

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Meat inspection and certification procedures, wholesomeness of carcass, techniques for differentiation of meat of different species of animals, laboratory tests for evaluation of wholesome meat, examination of live and dead animals in forensic cases, necropsy techniques, safety measures to be observed while performing necropsy, disposal of carcasses suspected to be suffering from contagious and zoonotic diseases, visits to slaughter house / abattoir for examining, processing (meat by-products) and further processing (value addition) technologies

Credit 4

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Basic and clinical aspects of the more common poisonings that affect domestic animals/birds and wildlife will be considered. Emphasis will be given to intoxication resulting from drug interactions, pesticides (rodenticides, insecticides, herbicides), heavy metals (arsenic, copper, lead, iron, zinc etc.), poisonous plants, mycotoxins, gases, feed additives, poisonous and venomous animal toxins, household toxins, prescriptions/recreational/over the counter medications, selected industrial pollutants and forensic considerations.

Credit 4

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Students are introduced to various research experiences ranging from involvement in an approved intramural and/or extramural research project on campus, working with SNU faculty, to working several weeks or months at another institution, program or field investigation. Special topics are selected based on their research credibility and planned outputs. The level of involvement varies with the project, length of commitment and the student’s desires. This impacts the number of credits assigned in advance for the special topics electives.

Credit 2

END TERM VII

Semester VIII - X

The clinical training program consists of 45 weeks of supervised and evaluated clinical curriculum at an affiliated school/college. Students must spend a minimum of 20 weeks in the “core” clinical curriculum. The clinical core subjects include a minimum of four weeks each in small animal medicine, small animal surgery and large animal medicine and surgery; and two weeks each in diagnostic laboratory, clinical anesthesiology, diagnostic imaging and diagnostic pathology. The remaining weeks of the clinical program are made up of elective rotations (clinical rotations) and externships approved by the affiliated schools.

CORE ROTATIONS (MINIMUM 20 WEEKS)

  1. Small Animal Medicine – Includes Preventive Health Maintenance/Community Practice (4 weeks)
  2. Small Animal Surgery – (4 weeks)
  3. Medical Services – Includes Anesthesiology (2 weeks) and Diagnostic Imaging (2 weeks)
  4. Diagnostic Services – Includes diagnostic Pathology (2 weeks), Diagnostic laboratory (2weeks)
  5. Large Animal Medicine and Surgery (4 weeks)

Veterinary medical profession contributes in diverse ways, from developing drugs and protecting the food supply to treating companion animals and investigating animal diseases in the wild.

National Research Council

DEFINITION OF TERMS:

Elective: is an evaluated rotation that is not required as part of SNU core program, or required by the affiliate to complete the DVM program. Many institutions define electives as non-core on-campus rotations or clerkships. Normally students will receive a grade (associated with a course number) after completion of an elective rotation.

Externship: is an off–campus supervised and evaluated learning experience. Normally students will not receive a grade after completion of an externship.

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